Osteoporosis

osteoporosis vs normal bone

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by the loss of bone mass, unable to produce new bone units or osteons and to keep pace with bone resorption, the bones strength and resilience to fracture diminish. The body’s ability to form new bone begins to diminish after the age of 35 in all adults, bone loss usually occurs first in the inner part of the bone (responsible for force absorption and distributinon), followed by loss of the outer layer of bone. The rate of bone loss typically averages about 1% per year for women over the age of 35 and for men between the ages 50-55.

Primary Osteoporosis can be described as Type 1 (caused by estrogen deficiency) or Type 2 (linked to vitamin D deficiency and hyperparathyroidism). Type 1 is seen mostly in women but males who struggle with alcoholism or are on long-term glucocorticoid therapy may be at risk. Usually people between the ages of 50-75 are at higher risk. Bone loss typically occurs in the inner portion of the bone with common fracture sites in the wrist, vertebra and the femur head. A fracture in the vertebra or the femur head can result in a decline in function for older adults. Type 2 persons are usually over 70 years of age and bone loss occurs in both the inner and outer bone. Fracture sites tend to be the hips and vertebrae.

Secondary Osteoporosis is the result of a chronic condition or the use of certain drugs.

The symptoms of Osteoporosis affect one in three women. Fractures of the femur are a major contributor to mortality in the elderly. Activity (weight bearing), calcitonin, sodium floride, calcium and vitamin D may slow the loss of bone. For people who are osteoporotic it is important to perform regular exercise in the form of balance training and weight bearing activity to improve bone mass. Exercise is important to all of us but especially for those with osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis Stats and Facts

Here are a few important stats regarding Osteoporosis:

  • Osteoporosis causes 70-90% of the 30,000 hip fractures that occur annually
  • Over 80% of all fractures in people 50+ are caused by osteoporosis
  • 28% of women and 37% of men who suffer a hip fracture will die within the following year
  • 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men will suffer an osteoporotic fracture during their lifetime
  • Fractures from osteoporosis are more common than heart attack, stroke and breast cancer combined.

 

Stats gathered from: http://www.osteoporosis.ca/osteoporosis-and-you/osteoporosis-facts-and-statistics/

How Can Exercise Help?

Builds Strength: Strength training will help improve muscle mass and strength

Prevents Falls: Using balance exercises can improve a persons balance and coordination which will help prevent falls which can help reduce the risk of fractures.

Protects The Spine: Spine fractures can be caused by excessive forces acting on the vertebrae that they cannot withstand. By targeting the muscles of your core and back you can improve posture and reduce the risk of spinal fractures.

Slows The Rate Of Bone Loss: Exercises aimed at increasing muscle strength in combination with weight bearing aerobic activity will help to prevent bone loss as we age.

Besides these benefits, regular exercise can help lower rates of depression, heart disease, dementia, cancer, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

Upcoming Osteoporosis Events

For those interested in learning more about how exercise and nutrition can help combat Osteoporosis Pure Integrated Training will be hosting a FREE information session with Keegan Marshall CPT,CES and Dr. Besner. This information session will take place January 19th 2016 at 6pm in the gym. Also, beginning February 1st 2016 Pure Integrated Training will be offering an Osteoporosis group workout session twice a week. The cost for each month will be $45 per participant. Spaces will be limited and offered on a first come first serve basis, to reserve your spot for the information session/exercise class or for more information call 778-441-4121 or email info@pitfitness.ca

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